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You Bring the Skills, We Bring the Opportunity!

Upper90 Magazine is pleased to announce the second annual Next Level ID Camp, a unique opportunity for soccer players based in the Southeast. The second annual Upper90 Magazine Next Level ID Camp will give young players from our region a chance to be trained by top UEFA PRO licensed trainers from around the world and the added bonus of being seen by talent scouts. The Next Level ID Camp will push their skills to the max and let them see what it takes to move their game to the next level.

Stephen Payne in his new Estoril Prais training kit.

Upper90 Magazine is flying in UEFA PRO licensed trainers from Europe to hold a three-day camp to allow talent in our area to experience true European training. This is an amazing opportunity to learn from top trainers and to be seen by true talent scouts who represent top clubs in Portugal, Netherlands, France, Italy, just to name a few. We are accepting 25 players from each birth year from 1998 – 2005.

Open to girls and boys with birth years from 1998-2005.  The sessions are small sided technical in the morning and more tactical in the afternoon. With the success of local talent Stephen and Toni Payne these scouts are anxious to see what other talent this area has to offer. This ID Camp is a chance for you to push your skills to the max and showcase your talents. Players will receive an evaluation at the end of camp which will help you understand what your player needs to take their game to the next level. Limited space available.

 

Register Now!

 

Stephen Payne took time to train in town with a local group of young players before heading to play professionally in Portugal. Receiving tips from Payne were, from left, Wilson Rhodes, Omer Anwar Mohamedali, Weston Oltmanns, Nochole Payne, Stephen Payne, Shane Bell Jr., Andrew Thomason, Josh Owens, and Harrison Kilgore.

QA with the Trainers

What are you looking for in young players in each age group at the Next Level ID Camp?

At young age (10-13) you can see if technically a player can make it. So I would focus on technical details, individual-tactics, partner-tactics and small group-tactics from 1v1 to 4v4 (small sided games). To get them into offensive 2v1 or 3v2 situations in which they have to take a decision. Always focused on small scrimmages and always with goals and cognitive challenges. So that they develop an eye for the goal.

At the age 14-16 you can detect if physically they will be able to cope with the demands of professional sport. So I would try to get focused on stabilizing technical and tactical details and try to develop the physical aspects in terms of agility and speed. Also in terms of becoming a body which is less prone to injuries.

From 17-19 you can start to see if a player have the mental side (self-confidence, not afraid to risk some actions in the game) and how he prepares for training/matches and professional sport (nutrition etc.) This is the age where you must be ready. If you get a chance, you have to take it. Training is always complex and focused on game-situation training – most time in competitions.

For all age groups I think, it’s most important to have fun playing football. And be motivated to train as often as possible also in individual training. Passion and ambition is the key for everything.

 

Register Now!

 

Stephen Payne

The Alabama native and former Vestavia standout has always dreamed of playing in Europe. Now that he has that opportunity, he can’t wait for his chance to give it his all. Even if it does mean learning a new language.

Read more about Stephen Payne in the November December issue of Upper90 Magazine.